(Southern) street finds – SLS or SLR?

There haven’t been many outstanding street finds in Zurich lately, which hopefully means the owners have taken the really nice cars on a trips to sunnier locations than Switzerland has offered this summer. In such situations it helps having a son who last week happened to be in another city that is a rolling car Mecca, namely Monaco. He drove there with his friends from Nice in the morning, texted me in the first hour that there were more Brabuses on the streets than regular Merc’s, and then once they made it up to the Casino square, he sent me the top two pictures below.

The reason he didn’t send more was that the police came and told him it’s no longer allowed to photograph cars outside of the Hôtel de Paris, next to the Casino. Given this has been the favourite past-time of any car lover who’s ever been in Monaco for as long as anyone can remember and that car owners certainly didn’t mind, this is indeed very strange. Then again it’s still mandatory in Monaco to wear face masks everywhere, including outside, so Covid seems to have left some traces that this is maybe a consequence of. Leaving that aside however, the picture brings about the interesting question: which one of these highly competent but also highly collectable supercars would you go for, if you were fortunate enough to have the choice?

The SLR not only precedes the SLS by a letter but also by seven years as it was introduced in 2003 as its direct predecessor. It was built until 2009 by McLaren in Woking, having been developed jointly by the two manufacturers. The production was limited to 3500 cars but in the end only 2157 were built and of these, around 25% were roadsters. The engine was developed by AMG and was a compressor-charged V8 mounted behind the front axle and producing 626 hp in the first version until 2006, and 650 hp in the so called 722 update available from 2006 onwards (722 being Stirling Moss’s start number back in the day in the Mille Miglia race with the car the SLR takes its inspiration from, the original 300 SLR). Both SLR versions have a top speed of over 330 km/h which is truly sensational for a 15-year old car, and are paired to Mercedes’s 5-speed automatic from the time, which is far less sensational and probably the biggest drawback with the whole car, simply being too slow for a true supercar.

The SLR is to me a beautiful creation, a combination of an original and aggressive design and a slightly “old school” supercar construction, unfortunately with an interior that is not at all as spectacular as the exterior. Today these beauties cost from EUR 250.000 upwards for the coupé and from EUR 350.000 for the roadster as shown on the piture, with the 722 coupé as well as really low-mileage cars being more expensive and the 722 roadster, of which only 150 were built, far higher, if you can find one. There is currently one for sale in Switzerland at CHF 850.000.

The SLS was introduced the same year production of the SLR ended in 2009 and around 5.000 cars were built over the coming five years until 2014. Its official name is Mercedes-Benz SLS 63 AMG but even if AMG comes at the end, this was the first car that was completely developed by the company, although the car was put together at Mercedes in Sindelfingen. The engines were of course hand-built in Affalterbach. The SLS had true gullwing doors rather than the butterfly doors of the SLR, by far the most distinctive characteristic of the car (the roadster version obviouysly has conventional doors). Another far more important difference to the SLR is the SLS’s naturally-aspirated V8, the legendary 6.2 litre AMG engine developing 571 hp initally, 20 hp more in the GT versions from 2012, and 631 hp in the Black Series version in 2013. It also had a more modern, 7-speed, double-clutch speedshift box in all versions.

Finding an SLS is both easier and cheaper than finding an SLR. Both the first version and the GT start at or even slightly below EUR 200.000, going up to around EUR 250.000 for low-mileage cars. The Black Series is a different story, starting at twice that price and going all the way up towards EUR 700.000.

So to come back to the initial question, which one would you choose? If you’re in the market for these cars then the initial price difference is probably not decisive. Design-wise my vote goes to the SLR (just look at it!). It brings much more drama than the more restrained SLS, but clearly both cars are beautiful creations. Engine-wise however, a 6.2 litre, naturally aspirated AMG V8 will always beat a supercharged engine if you ask me, especially when it’s paired to a much better gearbox. Finally, if reason is to play any role at all here, whereas the SLR will be truly horrendously expensive to maintain, the SLS will just be very expensive.

Both these cars are true collectables but they are also and above all, true driving machines. If you’re lucky enough to consider either one of them, please don’t just park them in front of a nice hotel for others to see, even if they’re not allowed to take pictures of them anymore!

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