The hooligan and the gentleman!

It’s time for an update on my personal garage and the 16 cylinders and some 960 hp in total I have standing there, split between the all-weather family, full-size Range Rover 5.0 SC and the summer and good-weather BMW 650 Xi Convertible. Due to too much work they unfortunately spend a bit too much time in the garage this year, but then again given current prices at the pump, that’s probably all the better… The Beamer has been with me a couple of years by now, the Range for about half a year, and the combination of them has led to something that’s never happened to me before: a lack of urge to buy another car. You’ll tell me I haven’t had them for very long, but that’s not knowing me… Of course I still look and imagine this and that, but I only do so for various, wonderful classic cars. The urge for anything new(er) is no longer there. I guess I’m quite content, probably partly due to age, but partly obviously also to how excellent both cars have been.

I’m very pleased with the 650i which for me at 20% of the price as new is really exceptional value!

As a small reminder, none of the two are new, being production years 2014 (BMW) and 2015 (RR). Both were bought through dealers (as guarantees are very useful…) but had in both cases only had one previous owner who must have had a love affair with their automobiles as both were in mint condition – and of course still are! The BMW has been a summer car all its life and shared a garage with 4-5 other cars at its previous owner’s, making you wonder why he bought the 4-wheel drive version (I would have preferred the rear-wheel drive, but it’s very hard to find one). The Range lived the first part of its life in Ticino in southern Switzerland and was according to the GPS history used in a mix of business trips to Italian cities and skiing trips to the Swiss Alps, two areas where the car excels. That’s by the way a good place to look – most owners don’t bother or forget to empty the GPS when they trade in their car, and it can give you a good indication of what kind of trips it has been used for.

Of a completely different character, the RR is very much master of its game!

The logic behind the 650Xi was to have a convertible that offered enough space both for holidays for two, cabin space for four on the occasions the children are with us, and put a smile on your face when you floor it. It delivers on all three. Room in the back seat isn’t huge (given the total size of the car it’s actually pretty pathetic), but on somewhat longer trips it’s less the room and more the fact that you sit where you sit and cannot easily change position that makes it a bit less comfortable. The boot is all you need both with the roof down but obviously even more so when the top is up, when it’s also by far the most quiet convertible I’ve ever been in. It’s especially impressive how little wind noise there is even at higher speeds. Those higher speeds are a bit too easy to reach with the double-turbo, 450 hp V8, which is a real hooligan that keeps pushing you to do things you shouldn’t. There’s an ever so slight delay before the first turbo kicks in but it’s less than on my old E63, and gear changes are also far more immediate and extremely discrete. The exhaust popping is just magnificent and makes you wonder why anyone would bother with an aftermarket exhaust, which many owners do.

You can improve the legroom in the back and still drive the car when you need to…

If there’s one car I’ve always looked at with desiring eyes through the years, it’s the full-size Range. The Sport is nice and the Velar is trendy, but it’s the big boy that in my eyes has the class and is the real thing. Now I have one in my garage, and it’s so far been absolutely great! The quality of the build and the materials continues to impress, and the Range is the first car that has really made me realize the difference between standard and high-quality leather. The seats are oh so soft to the touch as well as to your butt and you can of course enjoy them in any position you want, with more adjustments than anyone needs. Some people wonder why there are extra armrests on the front seats between the seats and the center armrest, but once you’ve driven it a while you no longer ask why – it’s there since it’s where your arm sits the most comfortably, not 10 cm further away. The whole car is full of such small attentions to detail that I love. Altough being a V8 of similar size and power, the engine couldn’t be more different to the BMW. It’s quick to respond but then a wonder of discretion unless you really misbehave, in which case you’ll hear a discrete roar at most. That also goes for other sounds, of which there are basically none, and the few remaining are easily handled by the 29-loudspeaker Meridian sound system.

No one in the Solihull factory confuses armrests with the center console!

Are the cars perfect? Of course not, but funnily (and I guess this is indeed age-related) what I have remarks on or think could be improved has very little to do with the latest technology. First and foremost, I’d like a bit more configurable driving settings, especially on the BMW, which of course became the case in the years thereafter. Here, it’s still Comfort, Sport or Sport Plus, without individual adjustments. Ventilated seats would also have been useful in a convertible, even if the interior is beige. For the Range, a more direct steering is probably top of the list and I get it in Sport, but then the gear change tries to be sporty as well, which I don’t like. Otherwise it’s really small things here and there.

The BMW generally has better tech than the Range but the latter has more stuff, much of which I don’t use anyway. The auto-parking is great, but so are the gigantic rear view mirrors that tilt down when the car is in reverse and supported by plenty of cameras, it’s really not difficult to park yourself. And so it goes. I certainly don’t need augmented reality on a screen in front of me as long as I can look out the window. I don’t need to talk to my car, and certainly not to wave my arms in strange gesture rather than pressing a button. And the few times I need better navigation than the cars offer, I have a great holder in both for my iPhone. Call me grumpy if you want, but I’d bet you there’s quite a large group of owners out there who don’t know how to use much of what their new car is fitted with…

Is this really what we want?

Before buying the Range I read and heard lots of people, usually not owners, talking about the bad quality and the astronomical fuel consumption. Time will tell for the quality, but how the now seven-year old car feels, and the dealer’s willingness without blinking to extend a two-year full warranty are very reassuring. As for the fuel consumption, I’m still averaging at around 12.5 litres per 100 km – about 1 1/2 litre more than the boring, four-cylinder with 200hp less in my old XC90. That’s well done Land Rover and not so well done Volvo! Of course it wouldn’t be a problem to get that number up to 20 litres, but that’s not the way to drive the car, nor is it what the car encourages you to do. Consumption also increases at (above legal) motorway speeds which is quite normal – unfortunately not even the Range can escape the laws of physics. As for the 650, I actually don’t know and I’ve made a point of not finding out – I don’t want consumption numbers to ruin the fun!

For now, all is thus as it should be down in the family garage and when it’s time for a drive, it’s a wonderful feeling to choose between the cars, knowing that whichever one I take, it will be a special ride. That was really my goal and I hope you have the same feeling, whatever your dream pair is. With the risk of being reminded of writing this at some point in the future, I suspect the BMW and the Range could be the last cars of this type in my garage. What I mean is that is that there’s a clear risk as things stand that in a year’s time we fondly remember the days when oil was “only” $100 a barrel, or that our great political leaders force us down the avenue of electrification, in spite of a lack of rationality, as illustrated last week. Before that happens though, I wouldn’t be surprised if we’ve reached “peak screen”, and that over the coming years, we return to more physical switches and buttons. Time will tell, but along with most, I obviously hope for that rather than peak oil!

One thought on “The hooligan and the gentleman!

  1. Chrillebslong

    How nice to hear that you, at last are satisfied with your choice of cars! However, as I regard you as proaktivt when it concerns the carindustry I find your conclusions defandistic. This not the end of
    neither history or car debelopment!
    It’s around the corner you will find the future, not in your garage ….
    A dedicated follower.

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